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Digital Seasoning by Laila Snevele

Digital Seasoning by Laila Snevele

16-07-18

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Digital Seasoning: healthier eating behaviour for the new digital era

Laila Šnēvele is a recent graduate from the Design Academy Eindhoven. She sees her work as translations of food and human relationships. “Food is our common necessity, pleasure and culture. I am curious to explore the different roles that food plays in all of our lives. What is obvious for one, might be unacceptable for others. Where is the common ground?”, she says. Laila aims to explore people’s perception of food and how we look at things out of the norm. Her goal is to create edible experiences that are comprehensible, engaging and can improve our well being. With her new 3D visualisation of taste, "Digital Seasoning", she has done just that.

Tina Breidi by Retha Ferguson

Tina Breidi by Retha Ferguson

10-07-18

- South Africa

“Food is a global language to connect and act upon.”

Tina Breidi is a Lebanese born designer, based in Cape Town, driven by exploring traditional cultures and tackling social and environmental challenges. Since completing her Masters in Food Design at the Scuola Politecnica di Design last year, she joined Design Indaba and helped launch Antenna 2017, a new initiative between Design Indaba and Dutch Design Week. As our correspondent for South-Africa & Lebanon she will focus on writing about real human values. By presenting provocative concepts and projects she aims to show alternative ways of living, and changing people towards a more sustainable mindset.

Volumes by Marije Vogelzang

Volumes by Marije Vogelzang

28-06-18

- The Netherlands

What can food designers learn from behaviour scientists (and the other way around)?

This is a call to designers to dive into the world of behavioural sciences. Especially for food designers, applying insights into why people behave in a certain way will take your design multiple steps further. Yes, we as designers already do research ourselves, but I found that it happens in a different way than how social psychologists do their studies. So let’s see what they know, how they do it and let’s learn from them.

Emilie Baltz by Tim Wilson

Emilie Baltz by Tim Wilson

26-06-18

- East Coast, United States

“Food and design both have as a goal to better the human experience – functionally & fantastically”

Emilie Baltz is an American award-winning food designer, technologist and experiential artist. As a correspondent for the DIFD she will give a regular update on the technological and sensorial side of Food & Design.

Totomoxtle by Fernando Laposse

Totomoxtle by Fernando Laposse

19-06-18

- Mexico

Totomoxtle: changing family dynamics with waste of colourful corn

Last year Fernando Laposse won the Future Food Design Awards with his circular design project Totomoxtle, by turning waste of coloured cobs of Mexican native corn into beautiful surfacing veneer for interiors and furniture. In the meantime his project is raising awareness about the rapid loss of the original species of corn in today’s globalised world. Read how his project evolved in the past year.

Inés Lauber by Satellite Berlin

Inés Lauber by Satellite Berlin

19-06-18

- Germany

“Food is a mirror of society and a statement of the zeitgeist”

Meet our German correspondent: Inés Lauber. Inés is a food and experience designer based in Berlin. On a regular base she will be writing for The DIFD about the German scene of Food & Design.

Human Hyena by Paul Gong

Human Hyena by Paul Gong

16-06-18

- Germany

Food Revolution 5.0: speculation and discussion on future food and living

The Food Revolution 5.0 is now on show in Berlin at the Kunstgewerbemuseum. Our German correspondent Ines Lauber takes a look and tells us what to expect.

SAM - Marie Caye & Arvid Jense

SAM - Marie Caye & Arvid Jense

30-05-18

- The Netherlands

Meet SAM: the food system owned by robots

SAM is a Symbiotic Autonomous Machine, designed by French-Dutch designers Marie Caye and Arvid Jense, but not owned by them.

public waiters

22-05-18

- The Netherlands

How food delivery services affect public space

Ever since food-delivery services like Deliveroo and Foodora started appearing in cities, spontaneous meeting spots have formed as well – places where the deliverers gather while waiting for the next order. For practical reasons, the spots are often central and highly visible, and could therefore be considered one of the major physical manifestations of the gig economy in cities across the world.